In New York, half of the Govt admissions are for children under 5 years of age

The New York State Department of Health is closely monitoring the hospitalization of children associated with Covit-19, according to a report released Friday.

“The biggest increase is in New York City, which quadrupled between Dec. 5 and Dec. 19,” it said. Half of these combinations are for children under 5 years of age, so they are not yet old enough to be vaccinated.

According to Johns Hopkins University, the number of Govt-19 cases in the United States continues to rise, with an average of nearly 190,000 new cases per day over the past seven days.

The arrival of the new variant, and anniversary celebrations, similar to travel and family reunions, has caused a rush in trials in the United States, making it difficult to obtain in some places.

Dr. Anthony Fassi, a senior adviser to the White House on the fight against the epidemic, assured that the shortage would be resolved soon.

“One of the problems now is that the (tests) will not be fully available to everyone until January,” the epidemiologist told the ABC.

“But we notice a testing problem and it will be fixed very soon,” he continued, acknowledging his frustration with these distribution issues.

President Joe Biden announced last week that the federal state would purchase a large number of tests: 500 million kits, which will be distributed free of charge to anyone who asks.

But these tests will not be delivered until January, which provokes harsh criticism against the White House, as the strategy to combat Govt-19 has been focused mainly on vaccination for several weeks.

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On December 6, a few days after Omicron was first discovered in the United States, U.S. executive spokesman Jen Psaki was questioned about the difficulty in accessing tests in the country.

“Send free trial to all Americans, right?” She did the laundry.

Dr. Fassi also spoke about the Omigran variant and its dangerous nature.

Realizing how “extraordinarily contagious” Omigron is, he praised data from studies in South Africa and the United Kingdom, indicating a lower risk of cases.

“When you have new infections like this, it’s more than a real reduction in risk,” he warned, fearing congestion at the hospital system.

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