Scientists have discovered seismic ripples in the oldest spiral galaxy

BRI 1335-0417 is the oldest and most distant spiral galaxy known in the universe, having formed more than 12 billion years ago.

Image of a spiral galaxy. —NASA

The rapid generation of stars in an ancient spiral galaxy and distinct structural features such as seismic ripples provide important new insights into the early stages of galaxy creation.

Researchers may be able to learn more about the formation and origin of our Milky Way Galaxy from a recently discovered image of an ancient, distant galaxy. Scitech Daily.

BRI 1335-0417 is the oldest and most distant spiral galaxy known in the universe, having formed more than 12 billion years ago.

Lead author Dr. Takafumi Tsukui noted that they were able to examine this ancient galaxy in more detail thanks to a cutting-edge telescope known as ALMA.

“Specifically, we were interested in how gas moves into and around the galaxy,” Dr. Tsukui said.

“Gas is a key component of star formation and can give us important clues about how the galaxy fuels the star formation process.”

In this case, scientists were able to record the movement of gas surrounding the galaxy BRI 1335-0417 as well as detect the formation of a seismic wave, which is unprecedented for this type of early galaxy.

A galactic disk is a flat mass of swirling gas, dust, and stars that moves similar to the ripples that form on a pond when you throw a stone.

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