A powerful solar storm brings the northern lights to Texas

Storm and landscape photographer Wesley Lugenbehl photographed the Northern Lights from the small rural town of Vega, Texas. It’s the third time he’s seen them in Texas this year.

Wesley Luginbill

The northern lights, a mesmerizing display of colorful lights dancing across the sky that has captivated humans for centuries, typically occur near Earth’s North Pole. However, due to a powerful geomagnetic storm, this dazzling weather phenomenon – also known as the aurora borealis – was spotted as far south as the Texas Panhandle over the weekend. Lucky skygazers in Amarillo, Texas, reported witnessing the spectacular display on Friday evening.

Ethereal lights are created when charged particles are ejected from the Sun’s upper atmosphere, in the form of solar wind, and collide with the Earth’s magnetic field. According to Space.com. As Earth’s magnetic field redirects molecules toward the poles (there are southern lights, too), interaction with our atmosphere causes the light to be emitted. The colors produced are determined by the chemical composition of the Earth’s atmosphere. For example, oxygen molecules emit green light, while nitrogen molecules produce red light.

Corbin Voges, chief meteorologist at KVII-TV in Amarillo, captured images of parts of the sky glowing bright red just before 8 p.m. Friday.

Corbin Voges, chief meteorologist at KVII-TV in Amarillo, captured images of parts of the sky glowing bright red just before 8 p.m. Friday.

Corbin Fogg

The force of solar energy striking Earth’s atmosphere determines how far south the aurora is visible. Corbin Fogg, chief meteorologist at KVII-TV in Amarillo, captured images of parts of the sky glowing red just before 8 p.m. Friday. “When I heard they could see red plumes in Wichita, Kansas tonight, I ran a few miles outside of Amarillo to see for myself,” Voges wrote. “certainly, [northern lights] “It was visible on camera on the northern horizon.”

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Photographer Camille Davis captured the northern lights near Amarillo, Texas, on Friday.

Photographer Camille Davis captured the northern lights near Amarillo, Texas, on Friday.

Camille Davis Photography

Photographer Camille Davis captured a photo of the red sky filled with twinkling stars near Amarillo, Texas. “I thought it was a fiasco, but I came home and maybe caught something?” Davis Comment on the photo.

Storm and landscape photographer Wesley Lugenbehl also photographed the celestial spectacle at 7:40 p.m. from the small rural town of Vega, Texas, located just 30 minutes west of Amarillo. This is the third time that Luginbill has seen the aurora borealis in Texas this year, as he previously photographed the natural phenomenon in March and April.

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“The plumes were strong just a few minutes before, but they contain one of the best meteorites I’ve ever captured.” Luginbill wrote On social media. He was also able to film the poles dancing in a video clip. “Many things have been said about the Texas skies, but the dancing aurora borealis is definitely a new addition for 2023,” he wrote.

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