Must-see UNESCO european sites in danger

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Maria Sergeeva
January 22, 2018

Yet when was the last time you were planning a Eurotrip and were torn between all those beautiful and so different countries? Not to mention this difficult choice between the cities an? especially places to visit when you finally make up your mind about the key countries. When it comes to planning a trip around a continent as beautiful and diverse as Europe, it is impossible to identify the best criteria. And what if we propose you the 25 Most Beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe, which seems already mission impossible, when each one is better than the other?

Even though the research has already been done for you by UNESCO? you will find a giant list of 1073 properties, 37 transboundary, 2 delisted, 54 in danger, 832 cultural, 206 natural and 35 mixed.

Almost incredible, but true. Some of European places of interest are in danger and not only armed conflicts and wars, earthquakes and other natural disasters pose major problems to World Heritage sites, but also pollution, poaching, uncontrolled urbanization and unchecked tourist development. Dangers can be ‘ascertained’, referring to specific and proven imminent threats, or ‘potential’, when a property is faced with threats which could have negative effects on its World Heritage values.

Hoping that UNESCO’s protection would save these endangered sites’ most authentic appearance? nevertheless, we suggest you not to miss these European sites in danger, which fortunately are not so numerous. 

Medieval Monuments in Kosovo

The World Heritage Committee decided to extend the site of the De?ani Monastery by adding to it three groups of churches, the Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery, Gra?anica Monastery and the Church of the Virgin of Ljeviša. The site is now to be known as Medieval Monuments in Kosovo.
The extended property, mainly dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, was also placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to difficulties in its management and conservation stemming from the region's political instability. The Committee requested that the State Party (Serbia) work with UNESCO programmes, with the United Nations Mission to Kosovo (UNMIK) and with the Provisional Institutions of Self-Government in Kosovo in caring for the site.

Decani Monastery

The four edifices of the site reflect the high points of the Byzantine-Romanesque ecclesiastical culture that developed in the Balkans between the 13th and 17th centuries with its distinct style of wall painting. The Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery is a group of four domed churches, on the outskirts of Pe? featuring series of wall paintings. The 13th-century frescoes of the Church of Holy Apostles are painted in a unique, monumental style. Early 14th-century frescoes in the church of the Holy Virgin represent the appearance of the new so called Palaiologian Renaissance style, combining the influences of the eastern Orthodox Byzantine and the western Romanesque traditions. The style played a decisive role in subsequent Balkan art.

Gra?anica Monastery

Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City

In 2012, Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to the proposed construction of Liverpool Waters project.

In July 2017, UNESCO even warned that the city's status as a World Heritage Site was at risk of being rescinded in light of planning and development proposals.

Located at the tidal mouth of the river Mersey where it meets the Irish Sea, the maritime mercantile City of Liverpool played an important role in the growth of the British Empire. It became the major port for the mass movement of people, including slaves and emigrants from northern Europe to America. Liverpool was a pioneer in the development of modern dock technology, transport systems and port management, and building construction.

These are the must-see which make this site  a “historic town”.

Cunard Building

Pier Head with the three main buildings: Royal Liver Dock, Cunard Building, and Dock Office, is the heart of the early 20th century Liverpool;

Albert Dock Conservation Area, to the south of the Pier Head, comprises a series of warehouses and other facilities related to harbour activities;

Stanley Dock Conservation Area to the north of the Pier Head, comprises Dock Boundary Walls and several warehouses;

The historic centre around the Castle Street/Dale Street/Old Hall Street Commercial Area, extends to the east of the Pier Head. The area includes outstanding buildings from the 18th and early 19th centuries, in various architectural styles.

William Brown Street Cultural Quarter, to the east of the previous, includes St. George’s Plateau, St. John’s Gardens, and other public buildings;

Lower Duke Street, to the east of the Stanley Dock, comprises old warehouses and merchants’ Offices.

Historic centre of Viena

You might be surprised to find out that the historic centre of Vienna is also under protection of UNESCO.

The historic centre of Vienna is rich in architectural ensembles, including Baroque castles and gardens, as well as the late-19th-century Ringstrasse lined with grand buildings, monuments and parks. The site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2001.due to high-rise projects in the middle of the Austrian capital.

Vienna's Ringstrasse

Since the 16th century Vienna has been universally acknowledged to be the musical capital of Europe. In 1683, Vienna became the capital of the Habsburg Empire and developed rapidly, becoming an impressive Baroque city. The Baroque character was expressed particularly in the large palace layouts such as the Belvedere Palace and garden ensemble. A growing number of new palaces were built by noble families, many existing medieval buildings, churches, and convents were altered and given Baroque features, and additions were made to representative administrative buildings. Several historic Viennese buildings are now associated with the residences of important personalities such as Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert, when the city played an essential role as a leading European centre for music.

The Belvedere Palace in Vienna

Within the boundaries of the 371 ha Historic Centre of Vienna are located all the attributes that sustain its Outstanding Universal Value, including its architectural and urban qualities and layout, and that illustrate its three major phases of development – medieval, Baroque, and the Gründerzeit – that symbolize Austrian and central European history. The Historic Centre of Vienna has also maintained its characteristic skyline. The 462 ha buffer zone protects the immediate setting of the inscribed property.

Those facts make Vienna a must-destination when planning a Eurotrip.

The Mozarthaus Vienna (Mozart's residence from 1784 to 1787)

Yet when was the last time you were planning a Eurotrip and were torn between all those beautiful and so different countries? Not to mention this difficult choice between the cities an? especially places to visit when you finally make up your mind about the key countries. When it comes to planning a trip around a continent as beautiful and diverse as Europe, it is impossible to identify the best criteria. And what if we propose you the 25 Most Beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe, which seems already mission impossible, when each one is better than the other?

Even though the research has already been done for you by UNESCO? you will find a giant list of 1073 properties, 37 transboundary, 2 delisted, 54 in danger, 832 cultural, 206 natural and 35 mixed.

Almost incredible, but true. Some of European places of interest are in danger and not only armed conflicts and wars, earthquakes and other natural disasters pose major problems to World Heritage sites, but also pollution, poaching, uncontrolled urbanization and unchecked tourist development. Dangers can be ‘ascertained’, referring to specific and proven imminent threats, or ‘potential’, when a property is faced with threats which could have negative effects on its World Heritage values.

Hoping that UNESCO’s protection would save these endangered sites’ most authentic appearance? nevertheless, we suggest you not to miss these European sites in danger, which fortunately are not so numerous. 

Medieval Monuments in Kosovo

The World Heritage Committee decided to extend the site of the De?ani Monastery by adding to it three groups of churches, the Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery, Gra?anica Monastery and the Church of the Virgin of Ljeviša. The site is now to be known as Medieval Monuments in Kosovo.
The extended property, mainly dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, was also placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to difficulties in its management and conservation stemming from the region's political instability. The Committee requested that the State Party (Serbia) work with UNESCO programmes, with the United Nations Mission to Kosovo (UNMIK) and with the Provisional Institutions of Self-Government in Kosovo in caring for the site.

Decani Monastery

The four edifices of the site reflect the high points of the Byzantine-Romanesque ecclesiastical culture that developed in the Balkans between the 13th and 17th centuries with its distinct style of wall painting. The Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery is a group of four domed churches, on the outskirts of Pe? featuring series of wall paintings. The 13th-century frescoes of the Church of Holy Apostles are painted in a unique, monumental style. Early 14th-century frescoes in the church of the Holy Virgin represent the appearance of the new so called Palaiologian Renaissance style, combining the influences of the eastern Orthodox Byzantine and the western Romanesque traditions. The style played a decisive role in subsequent Balkan art.

Gra?anica Monastery

Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City

In 2012, Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to the proposed construction of Liverpool Waters project.

In July 2017, UNESCO even warned that the city's status as a World Heritage Site was at risk of being rescinded in light of planning and development proposals.

Located at the tidal mouth of the river Mersey where it meets the Irish Sea, the maritime mercantile City of Liverpool played an important role in the growth of the British Empire. It became the major port for the mass movement of people, including slaves and emigrants from northern Europe to America. Liverpool was a pioneer in the development of modern dock technology, transport systems and port management, and building construction.

These are the must-see which make this site  a “historic town”.

Cunard Building

Pier Head with the three main buildings: Royal Liver Dock, Cunard Building, and Dock Office, is the heart of the early 20th century Liverpool;

Albert Dock Conservation Area, to the south of the Pier Head, comprises a series of warehouses and other facilities related to harbour activities;

Stanley Dock Conservation Area to the north of the Pier Head, comprises Dock Boundary Walls and several warehouses;

The historic centre around the Castle Street/Dale Street/Old Hall Street Commercial Area, extends to the east of the Pier Head. The area includes outstanding buildings from the 18th and early 19th centuries, in various architectural styles.

William Brown Street Cultural Quarter, to the east of the previous, includes St. George’s Plateau, St. John’s Gardens, and other public buildings;

Lower Duke Street, to the east of the Stanley Dock, comprises old warehouses and merchants’ Offices.

Historic centre of Viena

You might be surprised to find out that the historic centre of Vienna is also under protection of UNESCO.

The historic centre of Vienna is rich in architectural ensembles, including Baroque castles and gardens, as well as the late-19th-century Ringstrasse lined with grand buildings, monuments and parks. The site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2001.due to high-rise projects in the middle of the Austrian capital.

Vienna's Ringstrasse

Since the 16th century Vienna has been universally acknowledged to be the musical capital of Europe. In 1683, Vienna became the capital of the Habsburg Empire and developed rapidly, becoming an impressive Baroque city. The Baroque character was expressed particularly in the large palace layouts such as the Belvedere Palace and garden ensemble. A growing number of new palaces were built by noble families, many existing medieval buildings, churches, and convents were altered and given Baroque features, and additions were made to representative administrative buildings. Several historic Viennese buildings are now associated with the residences of important personalities such as Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert, when the city played an essential role as a leading European centre for music.

The Belvedere Palace in Vienna

Within the boundaries of the 371 ha Historic Centre of Vienna are located all the attributes that sustain its Outstanding Universal Value, including its architectural and urban qualities and layout, and that illustrate its three major phases of development – medieval, Baroque, and the Gründerzeit – that symbolize Austrian and central European history. The Historic Centre of Vienna has also maintained its characteristic skyline. The 462 ha buffer zone protects the immediate setting of the inscribed property.

Those facts make Vienna a must-destination when planning a Eurotrip.

The Mozarthaus Vienna (Mozart's residence from 1784 to 1787)

Yet when was the last time you were planning a Eurotrip and were torn between all those beautiful and so different countries? Not to mention this difficult choice between the cities an? especially places to visit when you finally make up your mind about the key countries. When it comes to planning a trip around a continent as beautiful and diverse as Europe, it is impossible to identify the best criteria. And what if we propose you the 25 Most Beautiful UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe, which seems already mission impossible, when each one is better than the other?

Even though the research has already been done for you by UNESCO? you will find a giant list of 1073 properties, 37 transboundary, 2 delisted, 54 in danger, 832 cultural, 206 natural and 35 mixed.

Almost incredible, but true. Some of European places of interest are in danger and not only armed conflicts and wars, earthquakes and other natural disasters pose major problems to World Heritage sites, but also pollution, poaching, uncontrolled urbanization and unchecked tourist development. Dangers can be ‘ascertained’, referring to specific and proven imminent threats, or ‘potential’, when a property is faced with threats which could have negative effects on its World Heritage values.

Hoping that UNESCO’s protection would save these endangered sites’ most authentic appearance? nevertheless, we suggest you not to miss these European sites in danger, which fortunately are not so numerous. 

Medieval Monuments in Kosovo

The World Heritage Committee decided to extend the site of the De?ani Monastery by adding to it three groups of churches, the Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery, Gra?anica Monastery and the Church of the Virgin of Ljeviša. The site is now to be known as Medieval Monuments in Kosovo.
The extended property, mainly dating from the 13th and 14th centuries, was also placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to difficulties in its management and conservation stemming from the region's political instability. The Committee requested that the State Party (Serbia) work with UNESCO programmes, with the United Nations Mission to Kosovo (UNMIK) and with the Provisional Institutions of Self-Government in Kosovo in caring for the site.

Decani Monastery

The four edifices of the site reflect the high points of the Byzantine-Romanesque ecclesiastical culture that developed in the Balkans between the 13th and 17th centuries with its distinct style of wall painting. The Patriarchate of Pe? Monastery is a group of four domed churches, on the outskirts of Pe? featuring series of wall paintings. The 13th-century frescoes of the Church of Holy Apostles are painted in a unique, monumental style. Early 14th-century frescoes in the church of the Holy Virgin represent the appearance of the new so called Palaiologian Renaissance style, combining the influences of the eastern Orthodox Byzantine and the western Romanesque traditions. The style played a decisive role in subsequent Balkan art.

Gra?anica Monastery

Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City

In 2012, Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger due to the proposed construction of Liverpool Waters project.

In July 2017, UNESCO even warned that the city's status as a World Heritage Site was at risk of being rescinded in light of planning and development proposals.

Located at the tidal mouth of the river Mersey where it meets the Irish Sea, the maritime mercantile City of Liverpool played an important role in the growth of the British Empire. It became the major port for the mass movement of people, including slaves and emigrants from northern Europe to America. Liverpool was a pioneer in the development of modern dock technology, transport systems and port management, and building construction.

These are the must-see which make this site  a “historic town”.

Cunard Building

Pier Head with the three main buildings: Royal Liver Dock, Cunard Building, and Dock Office, is the heart of the early 20th century Liverpool;

Albert Dock Conservation Area, to the south of the Pier Head, comprises a series of warehouses and other facilities related to harbour activities;

Stanley Dock Conservation Area to the north of the Pier Head, comprises Dock Boundary Walls and several warehouses;

The historic centre around the Castle Street/Dale Street/Old Hall Street Commercial Area, extends to the east of the Pier Head. The area includes outstanding buildings from the 18th and early 19th centuries, in various architectural styles.

William Brown Street Cultural Quarter, to the east of the previous, includes St. George’s Plateau, St. John’s Gardens, and other public buildings;

Lower Duke Street, to the east of the Stanley Dock, comprises old warehouses and merchants’ Offices.

Historic centre of Viena

You might be surprised to find out that the historic centre of Vienna is also under protection of UNESCO.

The historic centre of Vienna is rich in architectural ensembles, including Baroque castles and gardens, as well as the late-19th-century Ringstrasse lined with grand buildings, monuments and parks. The site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2001.due to high-rise projects in the middle of the Austrian capital.

Vienna's Ringstrasse

Since the 16th century Vienna has been universally acknowledged to be the musical capital of Europe. In 1683, Vienna became the capital of the Habsburg Empire and developed rapidly, becoming an impressive Baroque city. The Baroque character was expressed particularly in the large palace layouts such as the Belvedere Palace and garden ensemble. A growing number of new palaces were built by noble families, many existing medieval buildings, churches, and convents were altered and given Baroque features, and additions were made to representative administrative buildings. Several historic Viennese buildings are now associated with the residences of important personalities such as Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert, when the city played an essential role as a leading European centre for music.

The Belvedere Palace in Vienna

Within the boundaries of the 371 ha Historic Centre of Vienna are located all the attributes that sustain its Outstanding Universal Value, including its architectural and urban qualities and layout, and that illustrate its three major phases of development – medieval, Baroque, and the Gründerzeit – that symbolize Austrian and central European history. The Historic Centre of Vienna has also maintained its characteristic skyline. The 462 ha buffer zone protects the immediate setting of the inscribed property.

Those facts make Vienna a must-destination when planning a Eurotrip.

The Mozarthaus Vienna (Mozart's residence from 1784 to 1787)

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